Monthly Archives: February 2017

  1. The best garden fencing ideas

    The best garden fencing ideas

    Fencing has to be practical and look great in the garden. And not just any garden – it has to be right for your own particular plot. Most fencing is used for screening. It might be hiding an ugly view, obscuring the neighbours or acting as a barrier to unwanted guests. Or even to stop winds from howling across a site. There are fencing options that marry practicality and beauty. Check out some different garden fencing ideas and advice below.

    The best fencing for different uses

    Solid fencing is the best for screening. It blocks as opposed to filters and when positioned carefully and even treated with a colour stain or paint, can either blend in or become a feature of a garden. Overlapping slats on panels allow water to run effortlessly down the panel and, when installed correctly, will last for years with minimal maintenance.

    Fence panels with slats or louvres are superb at breaking a view but not causing a blockage. They filter both light and any wind

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  2. How to repair a wooden fence

    How to repair a wooden fence

    Every wooden fence has a lifespan and that can, unfortunately, be shortened by a number of factors. If the fence has been damaged by the elements, or an errant football, or has been in constant and direct contact with the soil, things may rot earlier than expected. Repair is possible.

    Fence repair

    If a whole section of the panel is rotten, try easing it away from the supporting posts using a crowbar. Gently open up a gap between the post and panel to expose any nails. Then you can simply hacksaw through the nails to allow you, and a friend, to lift the damaged panel away. It can then be repaired by sliding out individual slats and replacing with new. Remember to hammer down the nails left in the post or pull them out using pliers before refitting the repaired panel.

    Broken fence posts

    Wobbly fence panels are often a sign that a fence post has given up the ghost – but it too can be repaired. Spurs (not Tottenham) can be fitted alongside the p

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  3. Thrive-ing in the garden

    Thrive-ing in the garden

    Last month, we caught up with Neil Wilcox, Information Officer at Thrive, about how gardening can help people from all walks of life build confidence, skills, and relationships. We look at some of the work that Thrive does, how you can get involved, and how social and therapeutic horticulture can benefit everyone.

    Learning about Thrive

    1. What is Thrive?

    Thrive is the leading charity in the UK that uses gardening to bring about positive changes in the lives of people who are living with disabilities or ill health, or are isolated, disadvantaged or vulnerable. This is known as social and therapeutic horticulture (STH).

    2. Why was Thrive set up? What was the driving force behind it?

    Thrive was initially set up by Chris Underhill MBE in 1978 as the Society for Horticultural Therapy and Rural Training. Chris was inspired after seeing the benefits that working with plants and land brought to people who had b

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