Outdoor Learning

  1. Bug Hotels – Roll Out the Red Carpet for Insects

    Bug Hotels – Roll Out the Red Carpet for Insects

    Most bugs are great in the garden. Even the nasties are part of a bigger picture. You can help keep this all in a healthy balance, and get your garden looking great, by building a bug hotel. Welcome them in, carry their bags to their room and always be there when needed. You'll soon reap the benefits. 









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  2. How to Stop a Fence Rotting

    How to Stop a Fence Rotting

    When was the last time you inspected your garden fence for signs of rot and fungal decay?

    Oh, you can’t tell me? Tut-tut, that just won’t do.

    Unbeknownst to many, the greatest threat to any innocent run of garden fencing isn’t powerful, gale-force winds - extreme weather of this nature is so unlikely in this country - nor a swift, slat-splitting kick from a hooligan idly destroying every panel within a two-mile radius.

    No, the true arch-nemesis of your fence panels and posts is far more banal. Slowly it creeps, until your entire fencing run is consumed, rendering it useless, and your pockets empty. Rot, is the most perilous hazard facing your fence panels and posts.

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  3. Never Feed Lettuce to A Rabbit (And Other Dangerous Plants in The Garden)

    Never Feed Lettuce to A Rabbit (And Other Dangerous Plants in The Garden)

    The majority of plants are lovely, friendly additions to your garden. All fluffy, colourful and pretty. Even sweet smelling. 

    Others are laced with danger. A little bit of research into potential newcomers, and existing incumbents, may reveal a darker side lurking in your beds, borders and containers. 

    Wisteria, lilies and foxgloves

    Wisteria is the doyenne of many cottage gardens, clothing walls, arbours and fences in long racemes of delightfully perfumed blooms. I, for one, admire and deligh

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  4. Signs of Spring in the Garden

    Signs of Spring in the Garden

    Spring makes its own statement, so loud and clear that the gardener seems to be only one of the instruments, not the composer – Geoffrey B. Charlesworth

    Generally regarded as encompassing the three months from 1st March until 31st May, spring can be a funny season, can’t it? This year, the first day of spring arrived in the form of ‘The Beast from the East’, followed by ‘Storm Emma’, covering most of the country in snow and battering us with high winds. Yet, within a matter of days, this winter-like weather had been replaced by beautiful sunshine and rising temperatures.

    In the spring I have counted one hundred and thirty-six different kinds of weather inside of four and twenty hours – Mark Twain

    Should there indeed be further inclement weather to come,

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  5. On the Up – Grow Your Own Fruit and Veg on a Fence Panel

    On the Up – Grow Your Own Fruit and Veg on a Fence Panel

    Everyone likes the idea of a bit of GIY (grow it yourself) but some are put off by lack of space. And a shortage of time. After all, allotment waiting lists can be long and a dedicated two days a week to keeping a plot ship-shape unfeasible. Never fear - if you have a fence panel you can be a top GIY-er. Honest.

    A vertical garden

    A sturdy fence panel is the perfect support for runner beans. Planted in the ground or into large pots, plants will scramble and twirl in and out of slats and sections of a fence panel. Same thing goes for climbing French beans. Oh, and cucumbers, pumpkins and indeed anything that either climbs or usually flops on the floor.

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